Plasma Research Program for patients with Hepatitis B

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Do you currently have “acute” or “Chronic” hepatitis B?  If so we have a specialty research program designed to help you as well as the research and diagnostic communities.  Your plasma is a crucial component for invitro-diagnostic companies in the manufacturing and creation of the test kits used to diagnose patients with this virus as well as further research into the virus.

Participants who qualify and participate can earn up to $500 per visit and you can safely donate 2x in a 7 day period based on the FDA guidelines for donor safety.  Plasma is the yellow, watery substance in the red blood cells which house various proteins as well as the antibodies for your diagnosis.  The plasma is separated via a procedure called plasmapheresis and your red blood cells are returned to you which is why you can donate 2x in a 7 day period.  Donating plasma is a very safe and simple procedure and it is performed in licensed, FDA regulated plasma facilities under the direction of the centers medical director.

To learn more and to see if you may qualify please visit us at http://www.accessclinical.com, or you may reach us at 800-510-4003 to discuss the program further.

What is Hepatitis B?

It is a liver infection caused by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B is transmitted when blood, semen, or another body fluid from a person infected with the Hepatitis B virus enters the body of someone who is not infected. This can happen through sexual contact; sharing needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment; or from mother to baby at birth. For some people, hepatitis B is an acute, or short-term, illness but for others, it can become a long-term, chronic infection. Risk for chronic infection is related to age at infection: approximately 90% of infected infants become chronically infected, compared with 2%–6% of adults. Chronic Hepatitis B can lead to serious health issues, like cirrhosis or liver cancer. The best way to prevent Hepatitis B is by getting vaccinated.

How is HBV transmitted?

HBV is transmitted through activities that involve percutaneous (i.e., puncture through the skin) or mucosal contact with infectious blood or body fluids (e.g., semen, saliva), including

  • Sex with an infected partner
  • Injection drug use that involves sharing needles, syringes, or drug-preparation equipment
  • Birth to an infected mother
  • Contact with blood or open sores of an infected person
  • Needle sticks or sharp instrument exposures
  • Sharing items such as razors or toothbrushes with an infected person

HBV is not spread through food or water, sharing eating utensils, breastfeeding, hugging, kissing, hand holding, coughing, or sneezing.

How long does HBV survive outside the body?

HBV can survive outside the body at least 7 days and still be capable of causing infection

What should be used to remove HBV from environmental surfaces?

Any blood spills — including dried blood, which can still be infectious — should be cleaned using 1:10 dilution of one part household bleach to 10 parts of water for disinfecting the area. Gloves should be worn when cleaning up any blood spills.

Who is at risk for HBV infection?

The following populations are at increased risk of becoming infected with HBV:

  • Infants born to infected mothers
  • Sex partners of infected persons
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Injection drug users
  • Household contacts or sexual partners of known persons with chronic HBV infection
  • Health care and public safety workers at risk for occupational exposure to blood or blood-contaminated body fluids, and
  • Hemodialysis patients

 

 

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