Montgomery County resident First Hepatitis A death in Ohio in 2018

Update@12:18 p.m.

In an effort to limit the spread of Hep-A, Montgomery County public health officials are traveling to places where the risk is high and are vaccinating people, the agency said during a press conference Thursday afternoon.

So far, they’ve vaccinated 1,752 people are remote locations and 394 people who have come into their offices, officials said.

First report:

The first death from Hepatitis A in Ohio in 2018 was a Montgomery County resident, according to Public Health – Dayton & Montgomery County.

Public Health said in a statement that the agency is urging people to get vaccinated since they are seeing a large increase in the number of Hepatitis A cases in Montgomery County and Ohio.

“The best way to prevent Hepatitis A is to get vaccinated,” stated Dr. Michael Dohn, medical director at Public Health – Dayton & Montgomery County. “Proper and frequent hand washing is also a key factor in controlling the spread of disease.”

There have been 113 cases of Hepatitis A in Montgomery County and 666 in Ohio as of Oct. 15.

No cases were reported in Montgomery County in 2016 while one case was reported in 2017.

For 2012 to 2016, the median number of annual Ohio hepatitis A cases was 38 cases.

Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable liver disease that usually spreads when a person ingests fecal matter from contact with objects, food or drinks contaminated by the stool of someone who is infected, Public Health officials said. It can also spread from close personal contact with someone who is infected, such as through sex.

 

The highest case counts are in Montgomery and Butler counties.

People who work in restaurants are urged to receive a Hepatitis A vaccination.

Symptoms include fatigue, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea, light-colored stool and jaundice. Most affected feel sick for several months, recover and do not have lasting liver damage.

Hepatitis A can cause liver failure and death but is a rare occurrence that happens more commonly in people over 50-years-old and those with liver diseases, according to Public Health.

Who is at greater risk for Hepatitis A?

  • People who use street drugs whether they are injected or not
  • People who are incarcerated
  • People experiencing homelessness
  • Men who have sex with men
  • People with direct contact with those infected with the virus
  • People who have traveled to other areas of the U.S. currently experiencing outbreaks

 

People who know they have been exposed to someone with Hepatitis A should contact their health care provider or Public Health. Those who have experienced symptoms should contact their health care provider.

Anyone concerned about Hepatitis A is encouraged to reach out to their healthcare provider, pharmacy or Public Health.

 

Hepatitis A
There have been 666 Ohio cases from Jan. 1 to Oct. 15.
County Cases
Butler 110
Champaign 0
Clark 4
Darke 3
Greene 7
Miami 6
Montgomery 113
Preble 11
Warren 3
Ohio 666
Source: Ohio Department of Health

Deer overpopulation helps spike cases of Lyme Disease

Hepatitis A Outbreak Grows To 119 Cases In Nashville

Hep A

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The hepatitis A outbreak in Nashville has grown to 119 confirmed cases since December of 2017.

Officials with the Metro Public Health Department have continued to work with the Tennessee Department of Health (TDH), as well as other Metro departments and community organizations, in response to the outbreak. Work has continued to reach three at-risk groups.

 

Another Confirmed Case of Hepatitis A in Buffalo, NY

HAV

Another confirmed case of Hepatitis A brings the total number of reported cases in Erie County to 21 this year alone.

BUFFALO, N.Y. – Erie County Executive, Mark Poloncarz sent out an advisory Tuesday afternoon notifying all healthcare providers that there are now 21 confirmed cases of Hepatitis A in the county, so far this year.

5 of those cases have been connected to Doino’s Pizzeria Bar & Grille on Harlem Road in Cheektowaga. A cook, infected with Hepatitis A, reportedly served contaminated food at the restaurant. At least 4 people, reporting to have eaten there in recent weeks, tested positive for the disease.

Restaurant owner Eileen Doino told 2 On Your Side’s Ron Plants on Monday that she believes the NYS Department of Health should mandate the Hep-A vaccination of food service workers, “Because if they were, this wouldn’t have happened.”

The state lists only two groups required to get the vaccine; those working with hep-a infected primates and those working with the virus in a laboratory setting. Doctors and nurses aren’t required to get the vaccine.

Hepatitis A is an extremely contagious liver infection. While some people show no symptoms, others have symptoms so severe that it can be deadly.

The state claims only 2-3% of reported Hep-A cases are from contaminated restaurant food. And since turnover in the industry can be high, the state believes it could be impractical to force employers to vaccinate their staff.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention supports New York’s State stance, and like the state, the CDC website shows they have the same reactive approach to vaccinating food service workers.

In the case of community-wide outbreaks, the federal and state agencies believe they should be vaccinated.

Despite the substantial upswing in numbers this year, Erie County stopped short of calling the latest scare “an outbreak.”

“We recommend that all Erie County residents who have not been fully immunized with the Hepatitis A vaccine to complete the Hepatitis A vaccine series,” Erie County Health Commissioner Dr. Gail Burstein said.

The Hep-A vaccine is not cheap. The Erie County Health Department recommends calling your insurance company first to see if they will cover the cost of the vaccine. It’s important to keep in mind that the vaccine series comes in two doses, the second after 6 months.

Dr. Burstein says it’s important to go to a doctor’s office, a clinic, or the health department to get your shots because pharmacists aren’t licensed to administer the Hep-A vaccine.

If you have to pay out of pocket, the Erie County Health Department offers the best price, but you need to make an appointment. It costs $50 per dose, plus $17.84 in

 

administrative fees. The total for two doses is nearly $136.

Another case of Hep-A confirmed in Erie County

Another confirmed case of Hepatitis A brings the total number of reported cases in Erie County to 21 this year alone.

BUFFALO, N.Y. – Erie County Executive, Mark Poloncarz sent out an advisory Tuesday afternoon notifying all healthcare providers that there are now 21 confirmed cases of Hepatitis A in the county, so far this year.

5 of those cases have been connected to Doino’s Pizzeria Bar & Grille on Harlem Road in Cheektowaga. A cook, infected with Hepatitis A, reportedly served contaminated food at the restaurant. At least 4 people, reporting to have eaten there in recent weeks, tested positive for the disease.

Restaurant owner Eileen Doino told 2 On Your Side’s Ron Plants on Monday that she believes the NYS Department of Health should mandate the Hep-A vaccination of food service workers, “Because if they were, this wouldn’t have happened.”

The state lists only two groups required to get the vaccine; those working with hep-a infected primates and those working with the virus in a laboratory setting. Doctors and nurses aren’t required to get the vaccine.

Hepatitis A is an extremely contagious liver infection. While some people show no symptoms, others have symptoms so severe that it can be deadly.

The state claims only 2-3% of reported Hep-A cases are from contaminated restaurant food. And since turnover in the industry can be high, the state believes it could be impractical to force employers to vaccinate their staff.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention supports New York’s State stance, and like the state, the CDC website shows they have the same reactive approach to vaccinating food service workers.

In the case of community-wide outbreaks, the federal and state agencies believe they should be vaccinated.

Despite the substantial upswing in numbers this year, Erie County stopped short of calling the latest scare “an outbreak.”

“We recommend that all Erie County residents who have not been fully immunized with the Hepatitis A vaccine to complete the Hepatitis A vaccine series,” Erie County Health Commissioner Dr. Gail Burstein said.

The Hep-A vaccine is not cheap. The Erie County Health Department recommends calling your insurance company first to see if they will cover the cost of the vaccine. It’s important to keep in mind that the vaccine series comes in two doses, the second after 6 months.

Dr. Burstein says it’s important to go to a doctor’s office, a clinic, or the health department to get your shots because pharmacists aren’t licensed to administer the Hep-A vaccine.

If you have to pay out of pocket, the Erie County Health Department offers the best price, but you need to make an appointment. It costs $50 per dose, plus $17.84 in

 

administrative fees. The total for two doses is nearly $136.HAV